KUCHING: Scanning QR code to enter business premises is encouraged but not compulsory, said Senior Minister (Security Cluster) Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob.

“Some people might not like having their personal details recorded before entering a shop, so to avoid that, use the QR code. If they do not have the app for it, then they have to write down their full name and phone number.

“Like wearing masks, the use of the QR code is very much encouraged to facilitate the process, but not compulsory. If compulsory, it needs to be in the rules of the Prevention and Control of Infectious Diseases Act (Act 342),” he said at the daily press conference on Covid-19 security issues in Putrajaya yesterday.

He was responding to a question from a reporter on whether the use of QR code to register customers or visitors at all business premises is compulsory.

“It is not compulsory, but some states might have made it compulsory, but it is not in the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) or in the Act 342 that we have introduced or in any rules issued by the National Security Council,” he said, noting also that some states might have their own applications for Covid-19 contact tracing, while at the federal level there is the MySejahtera app.

On SOP compliance, Ismail informed that police on Tuesday issued compounds to a total of 88 individuals nationwide for violating the SOP of the CMCO.

“Yesterday (Tuesday), the police had arrested 56 individuals for violating the SOP in which 46 of them have been remanded, while 10 were on police bail,” he said.